African postcolonial literature essay

This is an impressive list but can I add that it is a list on decolonising the African and not necessarily African Education. There are a number of important subject areas of education itself that need to be reviewed: Methodology Courses, but also in other content areas like Geography, performance, cinematic and plastic arts, mass media and communication. What the list also shows are mostly old books and articles. There are new studies that are done in the different areas, archived in journals and books. The Leiden African Studies Centre does contain some of these new ones. But also as a departure, how about Oral sources in contemporary Africa where contemporary will mean the now, the present? Let’s keep talking

After this brief glance at African poetry, we realize that it is not simply an offshoot of British literary tradition. Despite the many disadvantages such as a scarred past, colonial trauma, expression in a foreign medium, inability to travel abroad, unstable economic and political state of affairs in their respective nations, lack of educational opportunities, the African poet has effortless creative capacity. It is an enriching combination of rich oral literature, native experience and imported tradition of writing in English that made African poetry a tremendous success both at home and abroad. The 'Black Orpheus' (African Poets) is no longer an unknown or an unwanted quantity but a fascinating and often enviable and beneficent literary marvel from what was ignorantly termed as the 'dark continent'.

The study of postcolonial African politics has both influenced (and been influenced by) salient themes in the study of comparative politics more generally. Goran Hyden, one of the foremost students of African politics, supplies that context in Hyden 2013 . The fields of comparative politics and international relations have always been closely interconnected and at no time more so than in the early 21st century. Four editions of Africa in World Politics since 1991 (and a fifth forthcoming in 2013) edited by John Harbeson and the late Donald Rothchild ( Harbeson and Rothchild 2013 ), have brought together leading students of these interrelationships. The study of African postcolonial politics can be properly understood only through an appreciation of the long sweep of African history, including colonial and centuries of precolonial history. Basil Davidson has been one of the premier students of African history, and Davidson 1994 brings together his insights and those of distinguished students of African history and politics to supply that perspective. The nature and condition of the African state has been perhaps the central problem of the study of African politics in post-independence times, but it has necessarily taken into account the roles and both colonial and precolonial precedents. At the heart of the problem of the African state has been the reality that as it is generally understood today the state has been a Western implant in Africa. Meeting the requirements of Western stateness has posed profound, even controversial, challenges for African political leaders and their citizens, a struggle that Herbst 2000 explores. The nature of the colonial state as a genre of Western stateness and their enduring influence on postcolonial politics are the subject of two magisterial books by Crawford Young, The African Post Colonial State ( Young 2012 ), and The African Colonial State ( Young 1994 , cited under Weak, Corrupt, Unreconstructed Colonial States ). The condition and problems of the state in post-independence Africa has been at the forefront of the study of African politics in an era when the economic as well as political failings of new postcolonial states throughout the developing world prompted the rescue of the state within the field of political science from its reductionist treatment in both modernization and dependency theories. Evans, et al. 1985 was instrumental in that rescue of the state.

The happiness of the long and arduous process of gaining Independence in 1947 was marred by the trauma of partition. This led to a change in the landscape of literature during this point. This point in history was a nodal point in the shift of literary culture. The horror and the unleashed mindlessness could not be explained in any way. The Hindi and Urdu writers were faced with a new social landscape which was characterized by people shifting base from one place to the other, envisaged with expressions of despair and unhappiness. The partition resulted in questions of identity, homelessness, alienation and rootlessness. This was highlighted in the writings of this period by writers such as Krishnan Chander , Rajinder Singh Bedi, Krishna Sobti etc. Their writings were characterized by feelings of anger and negation.

Robert Molteno
Robert was born in Cape Town, and played a part in the anti-apartheid student movement in the 1960s. Educated in law at the University of Cape Town, he went on to study Political Science at the University of Manchester. From 1967 to 1976, he taught at the newly founded University of Zambia in Lusaka. Following his return to the UK, he moved into publishing and became the Managing Editor of Zed Books which focused on developing countries, in particular giving a voice to local, socially committed public intellectuals and people's movements in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, the Middle East and Latin America. He is a trustee of the International African Institute and serves on the Council of the Caine Prize for African Writing. He also spends much time involved in a range of environmental issues, notably climate change.

African postcolonial literature essay

african postcolonial literature essay

The happiness of the long and arduous process of gaining Independence in 1947 was marred by the trauma of partition. This led to a change in the landscape of literature during this point. This point in history was a nodal point in the shift of literary culture. The horror and the unleashed mindlessness could not be explained in any way. The Hindi and Urdu writers were faced with a new social landscape which was characterized by people shifting base from one place to the other, envisaged with expressions of despair and unhappiness. The partition resulted in questions of identity, homelessness, alienation and rootlessness. This was highlighted in the writings of this period by writers such as Krishnan Chander , Rajinder Singh Bedi, Krishna Sobti etc. Their writings were characterized by feelings of anger and negation.

Media:

african postcolonial literature essayafrican postcolonial literature essayafrican postcolonial literature essayafrican postcolonial literature essay