Historical essays and studies by john emerich edward dalberg-acton

/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_9_Mott_Anthony_Stanton_ Image courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol Sculptor Adelaide Johnson’s Portrait Monument honors three of the suffrage movement’s leaders: Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. Unveiled in 1921, the monument is featured prominently in the Rotunda of the . Capitol. Catt’s steady strategy of securing voting rights state by state and Paul’s vocal and partisan protest campaign coincided with the Wilson administration’s decision to intervene in the First World War, a development that provided compelling rhetoric and a measure of expediency for granting the vote. 10 The NAWSA publicly embraced the war cause despite the fact that many women suffragists, including Rankin, were pacifists. Suffrage leaders embraced President Wilson’s powerful argument for intervening in the war to bolster their own case: the effort to “make the world safe for democracy” ought to begin at home by extending the franchise. Moreover, they insisted, the failure to extend the vote to women might impede their participation in the war effort just when they were most needed to play a greater role as workers and volunteers outside the home. Responding to these overtures, the House of Representatives initially passed a voting rights amendment on January 10, 1918, but the Senate did not follow suit before the end of the 65th Congress. It was not until after the war, however, that the measure finally cleared Congress with the House again voting its approval by a wide margin on May 21, 1919, and the Senate concurring on June 14, 1919. A year later, on August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment, providing full voting rights for women nationally, was ratified when Tennessee became the 36th state to approve it.

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    The modern mythology that has sprung up about Eostre over the past 30 years or so fascinates me. A lot of non-Christians (whether or not they identify as 'pagan') enjoy family customs such as dying eggs, baking hot-cross buns, reading stories featuring the Easter bunny to their children, going on egg hunts, feasting on lamb and consuming far too many chocolate eggs. They see Easter as a celebration of spring as opposed to a celebration of the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ. And yet they seem to feel a need to associate these customs with another deity - one who, for them, is the embodiment of springtime.

    Righteousness. The basic meaning of ‘righteousness’ and its cognates in the Bible derives from the Hebrew sedeq, which was usually translated in the LXX as dikaiosynē. It thus denotes not so much the abstract idea of justice or virtue, as right standing and consequent right behaviour, within a community. English translates this semantic field with two different roots: ‘right’, ‘righteous’, and ‘righteousness’ and ‘just’, ‘justice’, ‘justify’ and ‘justification’. In Heb. and Gk., however, these ideas all belong together linguistically and theologically.

    Historical essays and studies by john emerich edward dalberg-acton

    historical essays and studies by john emerich edward dalberg-acton

    Righteousness. The basic meaning of ‘righteousness’ and its cognates in the Bible derives from the Hebrew sedeq, which was usually translated in the LXX as dikaiosynē. It thus denotes not so much the abstract idea of justice or virtue, as right standing and consequent right behaviour, within a community. English translates this semantic field with two different roots: ‘right’, ‘righteous’, and ‘righteousness’ and ‘just’, ‘justice’, ‘justify’ and ‘justification’. In Heb. and Gk., however, these ideas all belong together linguistically and theologically.

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    historical essays and studies by john emerich edward dalberg-actonhistorical essays and studies by john emerich edward dalberg-actonhistorical essays and studies by john emerich edward dalberg-actonhistorical essays and studies by john emerich edward dalberg-acton