Sojourner truth biography essay

Sojourner Truth died at her home in Battle Creek, Michigan, on November 26, 1883. She is buried alongside her family at Battle Creek's Oak Hill Cemetery. Until old age intervened, Truth continued to speak passionately on the subjects of women's rights, universal suffrage and prison reform. She was also an outspoken opponent of capital punishment, testifying before the Michigan state legislature against the practice. She also championed prison reform in Michigan and across the country. While always controversial, Truth was embraced by a community of reformers including Amy Post, Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison, Lucretia Mott and Susan B. Anthony—friends with whom she collaborated until the end of her life.

As a free woman at age 43, Sojourner Truth left New York and decided to "sojourn" the land and speak the God's "truth." She traveled extensively, speaking about her life as a slave and eventually arriving in Northampton, MA, where she was introduced to the women’s equality movement. Some suffragettes were not receptive to Truth's support because they feared that their cause would get confused with abolition and that the newspapers would not cover their story. Perhaps her greatest achievement was desegregating the streetcars of Washington, DC. When various conductors refused to let her ride, Truth took legal action by reporting them to the president of the City Rail Way who fired them. She went on to become one of the most distinguished and highly respected African-American women in the 19th century.





Lesson Plan
Abolitionists Working Together
This lesson discusses the relationship between different abolitionists, including Sojourner Truth. Reference
Ain't I a Woman
Truth's famous speech.

Sojourner truth biography essay

sojourner truth biography essay

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